The Paris Review Has Visions Of Satan.

21 06 2015

And they mention that mini-meme about the “Kid’s Demon Summoning Game ‘Charlie-Charlie'” which some dumbass thought up to try to go viral. Do NOT use the Charlie game in a story or movie. You will be embarrassing yourself.

Now…here’s some psychotic’s visions of Evil.

https://i0.wp.com/www.theparisreview.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/15759249898_def59c81d3_o.jpg?resize=510%2C661





A Character Bursts From Another’s Eye Socket,

17 06 2015

Other Characters Are Doomed On A Haunted Ship,
Another Plummets From Fathomless Height,
One Becomes A Creature Who Eats His Mother’s Corpse,
Yet Another Bursts Apart Before A Rapt Audience,

Two Are Torn Apart Alive By A Monkey Demon,
One Is Frozen To Death In His Private Hell,
Another Is Drowned In An Illusionary Ocean,
And One Is Shot To Death By A Ghost.

 

This Is How They Die In “The Flesh Sutra”

51z68DAy2XL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-v3-big,TopRight,0,-55_SX278_SY278_PIkin4,BottomRight,1,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_

As heard on Pseudopod.org…
“Seeds of body horror and jealousy, avarice and desperation all wrapped in fin de siecle city life and the trappings of the Spiritualist movement. This is a beautiful, precision time piece of unease and tension and Tim winds it all the way up, smiling at you as he does so.”
— Alasdair Stuart, Host of www.pseudopod.org, the weekly horror fiction podcast





The Top 10 Disturbing Movie Moments of 2014 via Bloody-disgusting

21 05 2015

Bloody-disgusting.com shares the latest industry news and solid opinions useful for story design.





In Kansas City For ConQuest!

19 05 2015

Here is my agenda:
Friday 5:00 PM Is It REALLY Gothic? (M)
Friday 10:00 PM Body Horror: The Last Ewwww (M)
Saturday 10:00 AM Story in a bag
Saturday 12:00 PM Story in a bag
Saturday 4:00 PM NobleFusion Press Showcase: Readings and More

“Story In A Bag” is a writing session, improvising a story based on a prompt drawn from a bag.
“NobleFusion” showcase is me doing a reading along with other writers in my group. I’ll read from “The Flesh Sutra”.





A Sympathetic Victim: What I Learned from “Unfriended” and “It Follows”

17 04 2015

How do you generate sympathy for your characters? Two movies offer an object lesson.
I watched “Unfriended” and “It Follows” over the last few weekends. Both movies deal with the perils of teen relationships and sexuality using rather rote horror tropes. How the movies differ hinges on culpability and betrayal, and their different treatments of teen community.
“Unfriended” is just as you see in the commercials. A high school girl is drunk-shamed on YouTube which makes her decide to commit suicide. A year later, the girl’s friends are visited during an online chat by the dead girl’s ghost.
“It Follows” features a distillation of all ’80’s slasher monsters: an implacable, mute, supernatural murderer visible only to its prey. The creature is a curse passed through sexual intercourse, making someone truly and well-fucked if caught by the monster.
In “Unfriended”, the ghost reveals the betrayals hidden among a group of friends. “It Follows” shows a group of friends rallying to help a girl being followed by “It”.
The basic difference between the two is that we want the contemporary kids in “Unfriended” to get their comeuppance. They make catty remarks about each other, speak ill of the dead girl, and indulge in lots of booze, drug-dealing, and sex. The kids in “It Follows” live in a more romantic, surreal world. Their suburb is 1960s generic ranch housing with 1980s vehicles parked out front, and their pockets filled with cellphones and e-readers. That romanticism plays out in the kids personalities. They hangout on each others lawns, chide each other gently, even apologize at offense.
It’s said that to make a character sympathetic, give the character a pet. In these movies, I saw that a supportive family made the kids in “It Follows” seem kinder, even more kid-like as parents and cops swoop in to handle break-ins, accidents, and deaths. Aside from an ignored yapping dog, there are no other signs of life or love in “Unfriended.”
So, getting along with others, having others care, and having a pet will get the audience’s sympathy?
Not quite. “Unfriended” is much like “Tales From The Crypt” in that the kids are transgressors (two of the boys are criminals) being forced to own up to their betrayal of their friend. “It Follows” has a group of who are protecting one of their own by passing that curse to someone outside of their social circle.
Depending on how a writer would resolve either situation, either group could be heroes or villains. The ghost wants regret. Does the Final Girl take responsibility for her actions? The monster seems unstoppable. Does that Final Girl contain it to keep society safe?
The assumption of responsibility creates sympathy. Keeping wits and guile creates sympathy. If the characters already have gained sympathy, their failure would heighten their humanity.
Hi Horror! How ya doin’?
So bravery, compassion, and mature responsibility aid in creating sympathy.
I’m glad I thought this out. I found this useful for upcoming projects.
By the way, go see “It Follows”. Its clever, artful, and its soundtrack kicks ass. Wait for “Unfriended” on a small screen. You’ll save money and the movie will actually improve when watched through your computer.





Horrid Pause for Morbid Humor

8 12 2014

Have you seen “Black Mirror”? It’s now streaming on NetFlix.

YOU MUST SEE THIS!

It’s a series by Charlie Brooker originally aired on BBC4. The anthology episodes are heavy satire, using the theme of near-future technology stepping out-of-bounds. It is great SF, funny, and moving. My favorite is “The Waldo Moment” where the producer of a political program premiers an animated bear character who out-Blacks Lewis Black. The bear goes from “speaking truth to power” to becoming actual power. But all the eps are great!

I WISH I COULD WRITE FOR BLACK MIRROR! There’s a special Christmas episode coming on on Beeb4 this month. Can you send me a copy, anyone?

 








%d bloggers like this: